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Hello

R22 is over $350.00 for 30lbs tanks. Any solutions out there.
I see this new item by a company called Ecofreeez. EF-22a.
They claim thats it's a drop in replacemnet for R22 and can be used to top off and/or replace. Its made of hydrocarbons.
Very reasonable in price.
Any thoughts aout there will be greatly appereciated.

Joe Darby
 

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Great Stuff!!

Great Stuff!! At first I couldn't figured out the 30lb equivalent thing. But when I got it I realized that the reason they do that is because you will use less. For every 2.5 pounds of R22 I took out I only had to put in one pound of EF-22a. It worked like a charm and at lower amperage!
 

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The EPA has not approved propane to be used in central cooling systems.
 

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Can you tell me some further reason why it's not approved?

Unfortunately for the environment, releases of R-22, such as those from leaks, contribute to ozone depletion. In addition, R-22 is a greenhouse gas and the manufacture of R-22 results in a by-product that contributes significantly to global warming.

Also there are several reasons behind the Ban on R22. Such as recycling process for R22 etc. We may expect the new R22 based products may be available after 2020 hopefully.


However existing units can be repaired using R-22. Cheers :thumbsup:
 

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While R22 is very costly and not that good for the environment, its currently the only solution available that wont void the warranty. While the replacements do seem to be a promising solution for the future, unfortunately most manufacturers will void the warranty if anything other than R22 is used.

I have heard from several contractors that there might also be compatibility issues with some of the replacements as well. While it may very well just be speculation, some have stated that the replacements do not seem to perform as well as the actual R22.

Hopefully manufacturers will catch on and allow the use of the more eco friendly and lower cost refrigerants soon, as this would also help speed up the phasing out of the old R22 systems. Hope this answer helps!
 

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@beenthere how comes

EPA has not listed any flammable hydrocarbons1 as acceptable substitutes for use in air conditioning equipment to date; however, EPA has listed a number of flammable hydrocarbon refrigerants as acceptable substitutes for specific refrigeration uses, including:

butane, propane, propylene, Hydrocarbon Blends A and B (trade names OZ-12® for blend A; and HC-12a® and DURACOOL 12a® for blend B) in industrial process refrigeration;
isobutane (R–600a) as acceptable, subject to use conditions, in new household refrigerators, freezers, and combination refrigerators and freezers;
propane (R–290) as acceptable, subject to use conditions, in new retail food refrigerators and freezers (stand- alone units only); and
R-441A, a hydrocarbon refrigerant blend consisting of ethane, propane, isobutane, and n-butane (trade name HCR-188C), found acceptable subject to use conditions in new household refrigerators, freezers, and combination refrigerator/freezers.
EPA notes that the listings for household and commercial refrigerators and freezers apply only to equipment that was specifically designed to be used with that refrigerant. The Agency has not found hydrocarbon refrigerants acceptable for use in refrigerators that were originally made for a different, non-flammable refrigerant.
source - http://www.epa.gov/ozone/snap/r22a.html
 

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@beenthere how comes

EPA has not listed any flammable hydrocarbons1 as acceptable substitutes for use in air conditioning equipment to date; however, EPA has listed a number of flammable hydrocarbon refrigerants as acceptable substitutes for specific refrigeration uses, including:

butane, propane, propylene, Hydrocarbon Blends A and B (trade names OZ-12® for blend A; and HC-12a® and DURACOOL 12a® for blend B) in industrial process refrigeration;
isobutane (R–600a) as acceptable, subject to use conditions, in new household refrigerators, freezers, and combination refrigerators and freezers;
propane (R–290) as acceptable, subject to use conditions, in new retail food refrigerators and freezers (stand- alone units only); and
R-441A, a hydrocarbon refrigerant blend consisting of ethane, propane, isobutane, and n-butane (trade name HCR-188C), found acceptable subject to use conditions in new household refrigerators, freezers, and combination refrigerator/freezers.
EPA notes that the listings for household and commercial refrigerators and freezers apply only to equipment that was specifically designed to be used with that refrigerant. The Agency has not found hydrocarbon refrigerants acceptable for use in refrigerators that were originally made for a different, non-flammable refrigerant.
source - http://www.epa.gov/ozone/snap/r22a.html
 

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I know a very reliable Chinese fans manufacturer - INFINAIR www.industrialaxialfan.com
It has all kinds of fans, industrial axial fans, centrifugal fans, inline fans, roof mounted fans, mixed flow fans, sidewall exhaust fans and so on. It can match all your need.
 

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The best replacement for R-22 Freon is usually R-407c. It has a very low loss in capacity (0 – 5%) relative to R-22 and is less expensive than many other R-22 replacement refrigerants.

If a system has R22 in it already you cannot use a replacement refrigerant to simply add to the R22. For one, R 22 is its own refrigerant whereas the replacement refrigerants are made up of several different kinds of refrigerants designed to mimic operating pressures/temperatures of R 22. Equipment manufacturers will also tell you that unless the oil being used in your HVAC system is POE oil you cannot use an R22 replacement refrigerant in the system in most cases (M099 is the exception). Most of the older systems use mineral oil that is less viscous than POE oil, and the mineral oil does not work well with the new R22 replacement refrigerants. If the compressor has been replaced recently or the system is relatively new it may have POE oil in it in which case adding an R22 replacement refrigerant to a system that has little to no refrigerant in it is a viable solution that should be discussed with the homeowner.

If the system is still under warranty no manufacturer’s will warranty the system if you use a replacement R22 refrigerant, as their systems have often not undergone testing with the various replacement refrigerants
You should never under any circumstances add replacement refrigerant to a system that has any R22 refrigerant left in it.
 
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