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She's rusty, She's old .. But works like new.

Looking for information for this unit, Unable to locate a data plate but it is marked "American Standard".
I need to replace the motor mount before I tackle body work.
Any help would be appreciated, been searching online for sometime and unable to ident this unit

824
 

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Just going to need to remove the whole motor, mounting bracket and all. I am pretty sure a new motor mount will not be readily available. If you don't want to replace everything with brand new gear, I would think, one can get a second-hand unit that will do the job.
 

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I do not know what it is, but it looks very much like an old air conditioner. Its appearance reminds me ... In any case, I would recommend you to buy a new air conditioner and not to suffer from its restoration and search for a technical plate. Plus, you will spend a lot of money to replace some elements, and maybe all.
There are a huge number of excellent and inexpensive air conditioners. I recently bought an air conditioner for myself on https://www.airconservicingsingapore.com/installation/. I was lucky, I got on the time of the shares. This site has all the most popular models of air conditioners that are most often bought.
 

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You can follow the below steps to replace your motor mount.

Step 1: Check for clearance against the firewall before attempting to raise the engine. Tearing radiator hoses, crimping AC lines, or cracking distributor caps should be avoided.
Step 2: Secure the engine on a jack with various blocks of wood. Never jack an engine directly by the oil pan. The pan will bend and rupture.
Step 3: Loosen the engine from the mount bolts. Sometimes a long extension and universal joint is the way to go.
Step 4: Next, crawl under the vehicle and loosen the mount-to-frame bolts.
Step 5: Jack up the engine a little at a time and remove the motor mount.
Step 6: Compare the old and new motor mounts. Transfer any heat or drip shields to the new mount.
Step 7: Thread in the mount-to-frame bolts before lowering the engine. This will simplify mount alignment.
Step 8: Lower the engine and fully tighten all bolts.
Step 9: Front-wheel-drive vehicles often have third "dog-bone" motor mounts.
 

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I think I had that same unit up until 2013. Mine was an Amana, but I’m sure made by AS as yours. Mine was installed in 1979. Not bad and it was cooling fine when I replaced it. I only replaced it because the cabinet had rusted really bad. When I unhooked it and went to flip it over off the pad, the case just disintegrated. Amazing units, very well made.
 
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