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Hi there.
I work for a company that uses R-22 to regrigerate a "cold room". Operation temperature is 32 °F (0°C) approximately.
Its system works with a remote condenser.
To be clear, I am going to divide the system in two parts: the condenser unit (which includes heat exchanger, compresor unit, filter, etc...) and the rest of the system (evaporator and expansion valve)
I would like to change the type of refrigerant from R - 22 to R-410 A. However, it is stated that you have to employ some modifications to the system. My concern is not about the condenser and compressor, because we are going to buy it, it comes with the technical requirements and specification. I would like to know if we have to change the evaporator and the expansion valve.
Thanks a lot for your help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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You may be able to replace the R-22 expansion valve to a 410A type you need to check with the air handler/coil mfg.
The refrigeration lines have to be brazed not soft soldered.
the system oil needs to be flushed they have flush kits for that.
You may find it cheaper to replace the coil and refrigerant piping. Make sure the pipe sizes are correct for the new refrigerant.
 

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You cannot convert R22 systems to 410A. R 410 are designed completely different than R22 and operate at a much higher pressure. The displacement of a 410A system is less than R22 because 410A absorbs more heat per pound than R22.
 

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The way I read what he is doing is replacing the condenser that is R-22 to a new condenser 410A and wants to know if he can convert the air side to operate on 410 A.
I don't think he is trying to just covert from R-22 to 410A on an existing system.
 

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R-410 is generally not used as a medium or low temperature refrigerant.

It would be MUCH more common to see R404a in an application like you are describing.

If it is environmental regulations that you are concerned about, there are retrofit refrigerants available for applications like yours.
 
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