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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have basically switched to non-acid only and don’t even stock the acid coil cleaner anymore.

Have you had any luck on commercial kitchen refrigeration condenser coils with alkaline or non-acid cleaners or do you still find that acid is a necessity to melt the grease and crud off?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah, I don’t like to even handle the sealed bottles of it.
I’ve heard stories of severe bone damage in fingers from prolonged contact. Nasty stuff.
 

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if the grease is real heavy i use a good hand held steamer to melt it off, the finish it off with something like a 409 or simple green, ammonia works well but is a bit unfriendly to the nose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
if the grease is real heavy i use a good hand held steamer to melt it off, the finish it off with something like a 409 or simple green, ammonia works well but is a bit unfriendly to the nose.

What brand of hand held steamer unit is it that you have? Sounds like it might be a good investment. Was it expensive?
 

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You need some 'HOME BREW" for those greasy condensers.
2 pts chlorine to one pt ammonia. Add three parts water.

Ventilate area well and wear eye and hand protection. Hold your breath and apply liberally to greasy area with a paint brush. Let the chemicals do their work for five minutes.

Rinse with hot water.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You need some 'HOME BREW" for those greasy condensers.
2 pts chlorine to one pt ammonia. Add three parts water.

Ventilate area well and wear eye and hand protection. Hold your breath and apply liberally to greasy area with a paint brush. Let the chemicals do their work for five minutes.

Rinse with hot water.
Yes, but how can you do that when the line cooks are stepping over you, dropping crumbs and bits of food as they go, while you’re cleaning the condenser on the small refrigerator/coolers right next to the hotline? :)
 

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Yes, but how can you do that when the line cooks are stepping over you, dropping crumbs and bits of food as they go, while you’re cleaning the condenser on the small refrigerator/coolers right next to the hotline? :)
Once they smell the "home brew", you won't have anybody around you to interfere.

Or you could go back during off hours, that was the way I set up the really nasty condenser cleaning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I tried the Hydro Balance Power-Pac aerosol refrigeration condenser cleaner and it worked well. It has a fairly strong chemical odor, but this seems to dissipate quickly, is non-flammable and requires no water rinse.
A little expensive at around $7.00 for a 20 oz can, but I think it is well worth it. It also removes soot and fuel oil residue from oil burner parts, so has some additional uses as well.
 

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You need some 'HOME BREW" for those greasy condensers.
2 pts chlorine to one pt ammonia. Add three parts water.

Ventilate area well and wear eye and hand protection. Hold your breath and apply liberally to greasy area with a paint brush. Let the chemicals do their work for five minutes.

Rinse with hot water.

Household bleach has a chemical formula of NaOCl - that is, one atom each of sodium, oxygen, and chlorine. Its chemical name, for the curious, is sodium hypochlorite. Ammonia has a chemical formula of NH3, that is, one atom of nitrogen and three atoms of hydrogen. When these two compounds are combined, the following
reaction takes place:

2(parts)NaOCl + 2NH3 --> 2NaONH3 + Cl2.
Do you see that Cl2 on the right hand side there? This means one part chlorine gas, made up of diatomic (two atom) molecules. It also means that the chlorine gas has been liberated from the bleach, and is quite capable of causing you harm when inhaled!

Why not just use the K.O. Blaster http://www.rectorseal.com/index.php?site_id=1&product_id=65
 

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Household bleach has a chemical formula of NaOCl - that is, one atom each of sodium, oxygen, and chlorine. Its chemical name, for the curious, is sodium hypochlorite. Ammonia has a chemical formula of NH3, that is, one atom of nitrogen and three atoms of hydrogen. When these two compounds are combined, the following
reaction takes place:

2(parts)NaOCl + 2NH3 --> 2NaONH3 + Cl2.
Do you see that Cl2 on the right hand side there? This means one part chlorine gas, made up of diatomic (two atom) molecules. It also means that the chlorine gas has been liberated from the bleach, and is quite capable of causing you harm when inhaled!

Why not just use the K.O. Blaster http://www.rectorseal.com/index.php?site_id=1&product_id=65


Your preaching to the choir. I was mixing that stuff up for strategic ops back in the day. In an enclosed room of a hard target it would debilitate
antagonist personnel.

Today it makes a good cleaner. Mostly used in commercial kitchens where make up air is plentiful and poses no danger with the amount of air changes the kitchen goes thru.
 

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I went on the pill and when I had to talk to my parents about it they were more relieved that I was being responsible than upset that I was having sex. Plus the pill helps with cramping and acne, so it's a win-win-win situation!
what does that have to do with coil cleaning?:blink:
 
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