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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have added a ground to the liquid line of the ac unit before to avoid running a new wire back to the panel. My question is the neutral and ground are basicaly the same thing right? So what would be the big deal if you tie the two together?
 

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Using the liquid line as a ground is against code. And very unsafe.

The customer pays for you to run a ground wire. So no reason not to run one.

The ground is NOT suppose to be a current carrying wire. If you tie the 2 together. And the neutral at the panel comes loose. You now have a loaded ground. And a good way to kill someone.

Modern furnaces need an independent ground to work properly. Most can't work without a proper ground. The board picks up the disturbance on the harmonics, and locks out.

Again, the customer PAYS to have a new wire ran, NO reason not to run it.
 

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Old and Grumpy
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To answer your question in more detail....

Yes, it is all too commonly done. If you hook the neutral and ground together, you MUST be certain that the outlet is wired correctly, polarity wise, or bad things will happen when you plug in your pigtail.

A common trick, is to install a three prong, grounded outlet recepticle, putting a jumper from the neutral to the ground on the outlet itself.

Another common trick, is to hook the neutral and ground together in the furnace, and physically clamp a ground wire to the gas line.

I am not advocating any of the above. I am describing them for you, so that if/when you come across these in the field, you will know what you are looking at.
 

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Administrator
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To answer your question in more detail....

Yes, it is all too commonly done. If you hook the neutral and ground together, you MUST be certain that the outlet is wired correctly, polarity wise, or bad things will happen when you plug in your pigtail.

A common trick, is to install a three prong, grounded outlet recepticle, putting a jumper from the neutral to the ground on the outlet itself.

Another common trick, is to hook the neutral and ground together in the furnace, and physically clamp a ground wire to the gas line.

I am not advocating any of the above. I am describing them for you, so that if/when you come across these in the field, you will know what you are looking at.
Code violations abound. Which is what all of the above are.

Since the customer is paying for it to be done. Running a new wire is always the best option. When you don't have the required ground.

Its like using a recovery machine. The customer is paying for it to be used. Why not use it.
 

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North of 52
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122 Posts
Gas lines are NOT truly grounded and that won't work with a sh*t and is INCREDIBLY dangerous. There is a di-electric coupling before the gas line from the ground attaches to the meter so there is no grounding.
 
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