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CO or Carbon Monoxide also called carbonous oxide, is a colorless, odorless, and tasteless gas that is slightly lighter than air. It is highly toxic to humans and animals in higher quantities which earn the title of “the silent killer”, although it is also produced in normal animal metabolism in low quantities, and is thought to have some normal biological functions.

Follow these guidelines to help keep your family safer.

* Install at least one CO alarm near sleeping areas.

Home Safety - Home Safety Tips for a Safe and Healthy Winter

* Have a trained professional inspect, clean and tune-up your home’s central heating system and repair leaks or other problems. Fireplaces and woodstoves should also be inspected each year and cleaned or repaired as needed.

Home Safety - Home Safety Tips for a Safe and Healthy Winter

* Keep gas appliances properly adjusted and serviced.

Home Safety - Home Safety Tips for a Safe and Healthy Winter

* Never use an oven or range to heat your home.

Home Safety - Home Safety Tips for a Safe and Healthy Winter

* Never use a gas or charcoal grill inside your home or in a closed garage.

Home Safety - Home Safety Tips for a Safe and Healthy Winter

* Portable electric generators must be used outside only. Never use them indoors, in a garage or in any confined area that can allow CO to collect. Follow usage directions closely.

source:http://www.homesafetycouncil.org/safetyguide/sg_winter_w001.asp
 

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How to Avoid Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Every winter, several families have near-death experiences with carbon monoxide. Sometimes people don’t survive exposure to this poisonous gas in their home.
. Know where carbon monoxide is being produced in your home . This gas is produced whenever a carbon fuel is burned. Carbon fuels include kerosene, oil, coal and wood. Improper use of carbon-burning appliances or inadequate ventilation most often causes poisoning.
2. Have appliances that use carbon fuels serviced regularly. For example, furnaces and fireplaces should be inspected – if not cleaned – annually to ensure that they are working at their peak efficiency.
3. Don’t allow cars to idle in a garage with the garage door closed. This seems like common sense, but every year there are a number of deaths because of this.
4. Install carbon monoxide detectors. And make sure they are installed correctly (you can read more about that here.)
5. Recognize signs of carbon monoxide poisoning. Symptoms caused by low to moderate levels of carbon monoxide include nausea, headaches, vomiting, confusion and fatigue. These symptoms mimic the flu, but if more than one family member has these symptoms or if the family pet shows some of these signs, carbon monoxide may have reached an unsafe level in your home. Read more about that here!
Open doors and windows, and get medical attention immediately if you suspect carbon monoxide poisoning. Take victims to a hospital and contact the fire department. The fire department will find the source of the leak or leaks.

Source: http://www.goodhomepost.com/indoor-air/identify-carbon-monoxide-poisoning
 

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I remember once going on a call for a clean and check. When I walked in the door with my carbon monoxide analyzer it shot to 30ppm. I asked the customer if they had been expierencing headaches and the whole family had for a few weeks. Thier co detectors were the plug in kinds new and close to the floor but they had not been going off. The 8 year old Carrier furnace had a secondary heat exchanger failure. Furnace was still heating the home well, the draft proving switches had not shut down the furnace. I may have saved thier lives. I always check for co in the living space during clean and checks, and if I can I check stack co.
 

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I have read that the permanent (like what plugs into the wall, or hangs like a smoke alarm) CO detectors are only good for about 5 years and then they need to be replaced.

Seems if that's the case, they should include a feature that makes them beep non-stop once they have so many hours on them to force people to change them. An old non-functioning CO detector just offers a false peace of mind, which could be more hazardous than not having one at all. Maybe if this family didn't have a detector, they would have questioned thier headaches.

Stuff to think about for sure.
 

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CO or Carbon Monoxide also called carbonous oxide, is a colorless, odorless, and tasteless gas that is slightly lighter than air. It is highly toxic to humans and animals in higher quantities which earn the title of “the silent killer”, although it is also produced in normal animal metabolism in low quantities, and is thought to have some normal biological functions.

Follow these guidelines to help keep your family safer.

* Install at least one CO alarm near sleeping areas.

Home Safety - Home Safety Tips for a Safe and Healthy Winter

* Have a trained professional inspect, clean and tune-up your home’s central heating system and repair leaks or other problems. Fireplaces and woodstoves should also be inspected each year and cleaned or repaired as needed.

Home Safety - Home Safety Tips for a Safe and Healthy Winter

* Keep gas appliances properly adjusted and serviced.

Home Safety - Home Safety Tips for a Safe and Healthy Winter

* Never use an oven or range to heat your home.

Home Safety - Home Safety Tips for a Safe and Healthy Winter

* Never use a gas or charcoal grill inside your home or in a closed garage.

Home Safety - Home Safety Tips for a Safe and Healthy Winter

* Portable electric generators must be used outside only. Never use them indoors, in a garage or in any confined area that can allow CO to collect. Follow usage directions closely.

source:http://www.homesafetycouncil.org/safetyguide/sg_winter_w001.asp
very good info........thanks for sharing with us
 
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